Controversial Issues, Citizenship and History

Alan McCully

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterpeer-review

    Abstract

    The chapter compares and contrasts the teaching of controversial and sensitive issues in the fields of History and Citizenship and identifies core principles of practice.
    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationTeaching Sensitive and Controversial Issues in History
    EditorsGarry Mills
    PublisherUniversity of Cumbria
    Pages34-43
    ISBN (Print)978-085-358-2311
    Publication statusPublished - 2005

    Bibliographical note

    Reference text: Barton, K.C., & McCully, A.W. (2005) ‘History, identity, and the school curriculum in Northern Ireland: An empirical study of secondary students’ ideas and perspectives. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 37, 85-116.

    Barton K.C. and McCully A.W. (2006) ‘Secondary students’ perspectives on school and community history in Northern Ireland’, Paper presented at the European Social Science History Conference, Amsterdam, March.

    Giroux H. (1996) Fugitive Cultures: race, violence and youth, (London, ,Routledge)

    Humanities Curriculum Project (1970) The Humanities Project: an introduction, (London, Heinemann Educational).

    Joined in Equity, Diversity and Interdependence [JEDI] (2002) A Framework for Reflection in Practice: Guidelines for embedding EDI principles in youth work practice (Belfast, JEDI).

    Kitson A. (in press) ‘History education and reconciliation in Northern Ireland’, E.A. Cole (ed.) Teaching the difficult past: violence, reconciliation and history education.

    McCully A. (1985) 'The Relevance of Social Studies to the Teaching of Irish History', in R. Austin ed., Essays on History Teaching in Northern Ireland, (University of Ulster, Coleraine).

    McCully A. (1985) 'The Relevance of Social Studies to the Teaching of Irish History', in R. Austin ed., Essays on History Teaching in Northern Ireland, (University of Ulster, Coleraine).

    McCully A. (2005) Reflections on Teaching Controversial Issues in a Divided Society, Prospero, vol.11, No.4, pp.51-65.

    McCully A. (2006) ‘Practitioner perceptions of their role in facilitating the handling of controversial issues in contested societies: a Northern Irish experience’, Curriculum Review Vol.58, No.1, pp.51-65.

    McCully A., Smyth P. and O’Doherty M. (1999) ‘Exploring Controversial Issues in Northern Ireland’, Irish Educational Studies, Vol.18, Spring.

    McLaughlin T. (2004) ‘Teaching Controversial Issues in Citizenship Education’, A.Lockyer A., B. Crick and J. Annette (eds.) Education for Democratic Citizenship: Issues of Theories and Practice (Aldershot, Ashgate) pp. 149-160.

    McVeigh R. (1997) ‘Symmetry and Asymmetry in Sectarian Identity and Division’, Journal of the Community Relations Council (Belfast, CRC) pp. 8-10

    Robinson A. (1983) The Schools Cultural Studies Project: a contribution to peace in Northern Ireland (Coleraine, New University of Ulster).

    Slater J. (1995) Teaching History in the New Europe (London, Council of Europe).

    Smith A. (2003) ‘Citizenship Education in Northern Ireland: beyond national identity?’, Cambridge Journal of Education, Vol. 33, No.1, pp.15-31.

    Smith A. and Robinson A. (1996) Education for Mutual Understanding: The Initial Statutory Years (Coleraine, University of Ulster).

    Keywords

    • History Teaching
    • Controversial Issues
    • Citizenship
    • Divided Societies

    Fingerprint

    Dive into the research topics of 'Controversial Issues, Citizenship and History'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

    Cite this