Northern Ireland Beginning Teachers’ Experiences of Induction: the ‘haves’ and the ‘have nots’

Lesley Abbott, Anne Moran, Linda Clarke

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The induction of beginning teachers continues to occupy a significant position oneducational policy agendas as a crucial dimension in the formation of a teacherand one upon which an emergent career is built. Whilst there is growing impetusto establish an induction model that constitutes a relevant, fulfilling experience,current arrangements continue to vary throughout the UK. This paper describesinduction as it affected a sample of beginning teachers in Northern Ireland, wherethere is a dearth of permanent positions for those newly qualified. Highlycontrasting experiences of the induction year emerged between graduates inpermanent and one-year temporary positions, and those who were short-termtemporary and supply teachers. The former completed a meaningful inductionwhereas the latter, because of sporadic, fragmented employment, did not. Aflexible model of induction is proposed, with collaborative involvement of thehigher education institutions, the schools and the local education authorities.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)95-110
JournalEuropean Journal of Teacher Education
Volume32
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2009

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Keywords

  • induction
  • supply teaching
  • teacher education

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