Stuck between ceasefires and Peacebuilding: Finding Positive Responses to young men's experiences of violence

Ken Harland, Sam McCready

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    Abstract

    Findings from a qualitative study carried out by the Centre for Young Men's Studies with 130 young men from communities throughout Northern Ireland exploring the themes of violence and personal safety.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)49-63
    JournalShared Space
    Volume10
    Publication statusPublished - 10 Nov 2010

    Bibliographical note

    Reference text: Harland, K. (2002) Everyday Life: Young Men and Violence: A youth work perspective. Work with Young Men Journal: London Vol. 1 No1

    Harland, K. (1997) Young Men Talking: Voices from Belfast. Working with men, London / YouthAction Northern Ireland Publications.

    Harland, K. and McCready, S. (2007) Work with young men. In Flood, M., Gardiner, J.K., Pease, B and Pringle, K. (Eds) International Encyclopedia Men & Masculinities. Routledge: London

    Haydon, D. (2009) Developing a Manifesto for Youth Justice in Northern Ireland. Include Youth Publications. www. includeyouth.org

    Muldoon, O., Schmid, K., Downes, C., Kremer, J. and Trew, K. (2008) The Legacy of the Troubles: Experiences of the troubles, Mental Health and Social Attitudes. http://www.legacyofthetroubles.qub.ac.uk/LegacyOfTheTroublesFinalReport.pdf (Accessed 8th July 2010).

    Smyth, M and Hamilton, J. (2003) The Human Costs of the Troubles. In Hargie, O. and Dickson, D. (Eds) Researching the Troubles: Social Science Perspectives on the Northern Ireland Conflict. London: Mainstream Publishing.

    McAlister, S., Scraton, P. and Haydon, D. (2009) Childhood in Transition: Experiencing Marginalisation and Conflict in Northern Ireland. Queens University Belfast.

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