The Influence of Theory on Understanding: reflections from Twentieth-Century Fiction by Irish Women: Nation and Gender, Heather Ingman, Ashgate: Aldershot and Burlington VT, 2007

Eilish Rooney

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

An invitation to review Heather Ingman’s Kristevan study of Irish women’s twentieth century fiction sparked these thoughts on how theory influences understanding, in this case, of Irish politics, literature and gender. Intersectionality theory, combined with insights from Irish postcolonial studies, is used to indicate some critical implications of how a reading of ‘gender’ and ‘nationalism’ shapes literary interpretation.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)375-379
JournalJournal of Gender Studies
Volume17
Issue number4
Publication statusPublished - 31 Dec 2008

Bibliographical note

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